Today I talk about developing your empathy genius to experience deeper intimacy with Judith Orloff, M.D. Dr. Orloff is a psychiatrist, an empath, an intuitive healer, and an author. She combines her empath skills with traditional medical skills to enhance her patients’ care. In this episode, we talk about the experience of being an empath, surviving in the world, and how empathy heals. We also discuss how to build empathy for yourself in the crazy dating world.

Listen to this episode to learn tools for stretching your heart to make more room for empathy for yourself and others.

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Show Notes:

 

  • Why is empathy important now
  • How to tap into self-empathy
  • What are empathy statements
  • Is empathy a superpower
  • What does a practice of empathy look like
  • How to build empathy for yourself while dating
  • Where to find empathy in online dating profiles
  • What are tools for self-forgiveness
  • How does empathy affect our biology

 

Important Links:

 

Dr. Judith Orloff | Facebook | Instagram | Twitter

 

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How to Develop Your Empathy Genius to Experience Deeper Intimacy with Judith Orloff, M.D.

 

Ken Page:

Your capacity for empathy is one of your great geniuses, but it’s also so challenging. What are the practical skills that you can learn to heal your sensitive self, your relationships, and the world? Stay tuned to this episode of The Deeper Dating Podcast where I interview Dr. Judith Orloff, author of the new book, The Genius of Empathy.

Hello everybody and welcome to The Deeper Dating® Podcast. I’m Ken Page. I’m a psychotherapist. I’m the author of the bestselling book, Deeper Dating, the creator of The Deeper Dating® Intensive and your host on this podcast.

And today, I’m so excited to get to interview Dr. Judith Orloff, author of the new book, The Genius of Empathy, and she’s going to be speaking to us about harnessing and working with the challenges of this magical and powerful capacity for empathy that changes our lives.

In this episode and every episode of The Deeper Dating® Podcast, I’m going to share with you the greatest tools and insights that I know to help you find healthy love and keep it flourishing and heal your life in the process, because the skills of dating are the skills of love, which are the greatest skills of all for a meaningful and happy life.

And if you want to learn more about the Deeper Dating® path to intimacy, just go to deeperdatingpodcast.com. And there, you could get some wonderful free resources as well as transcripts of every episode.

So let me tell you about Dr. Judith Orloff. Dr. Judith Orloff, MD, is a psychiatrist, an empath and the author of the new book, The Genius of Empathy, which offers powerful skills to tap into empathy as a daily healing practice in your life and relationships.

She also wrote The Empath’s Survival Guide and Thriving As An Empath. Dr. Orloff is a New York Times bestselling author and a UCLA Clinical Faculty member. She synthesizes the pearls of conventional medicine with cutting-edge knowledge of intuition, energy and spirituality.

Dr. Orloff specializes in treating highly sensitive people in her private practice, and she’s been featured on the Today Show, CNN, Oprah Magazine and the New York Times, and you can learn more about empaths and empathy at www.drjudithorloff.com. That’s D-R-J-U-D-I-T-H-O-R-L-O-F-F. So without further ado, let me introduce Judith.

 

Watch the episode here:

 

 

So Judith, I am honored and delighted to have you on this show, and I think that your message and your insights fit this audience in a powerful, powerful way. So thank you so much for being here.

Dr. Judith Orloff:

You’re very welcome.

Ken Page:

So I’m just going to jump in with my questions. So first of all, so much of your beautiful body of work has been around the subject of empathy and being an empath and surviving in the world. Can you say something about the evolution of this book and how that relates to your personal and professional story, why this book needed to be written by you now?

Dr. Judith Orloff:

Yes, great question. Well, the book is called The Genius of Empathy, and I wanted it to come out right now because empathy is the missing ingredient to our better relationships, better dating, and our relationships in the global world. We need to bring empathy in as the missing piece. Without empathy, if you’re not expressing empathy in your relationships or your dating or anywhere else, they are not going to go very well. Empathy is so powerful because it lets people feel seen, feel heard, feel valued, even if you don’t agree with them.

And so empathy is what we need the most now, and I am passionate about traveling around and sharing this with people and helping people with the resistances to it, and also how to tap into it and towards themselves as well. There’s a chapter on self-empathy.

 

You would think self-empathy would be the first thing we would want...but it isn't. Share on X

 

Ken Page:

Yes, yes. And I’ve got questions for you on that too, because that’s such an important piece. Thank you, and I agree so deeply. Our world is being so fractured at this point and polarized, and that’s such a dangerous thing, and empathy is such a beautiful and essential book. So I really get it that now is a really good time for this to be shared with the world.

Ken Page:

Can you speak a little bit about how empathy is actually a gift, how it’s even a superpower and how it heals?

Dr. Judith Orloff:

All right, I’m a psychiatrist and I’ve gone through 14 years of medical training at USC and UCLA, and I’m also an empath. And so I combine my empathic skills with my traditional medical skills to enhance patient care, basically. I use it in my private practice, and this is a healing technique to bring empathy into anything, you’re igniting the healing energy.

And the healing energy is what comes from your heart. It’s not what comes from your head necessarily. It means listening to somebody, listening to yourself. If you go through something, let’s say you have a terrible dating experience or you get treated with disrespect, the first thing you do is you focus self-empathy on an inner dialogue of saying, “This was horrible. I don’t deserve to be treated this way. This was unfortunate. I’m not going to repeat it. I feel for you. I know what you’re going through,” and you talk to yourself like you’re a precious being. That’s the first thing. When you come upon emotional hurt or bad behavior, talk to yourself first.

So that’s where empathy can be healing as opposed to what I know most do is they beat themselves up.

Ken Page:

Yes.

Dr. Judith Orloff:

“What did I do to contribute to this? Why did they do this to me?” And they get into victim role and they’re not able to find their deeply empathic, loving self, which we need to find. And it’s almost counterintuitive that we have such a hard time finding it. You think self-empathy would be the first thing we’d want. No, but it isn’t. We would prefer to beat ourselves up, but most people go to that place.

And so that’s why it’s important as a healing practice to condition yourself to practice self-empathy when things happen, as opposed to coming down on your precious self, which is you, you need to connect to your precious self. And so it’s you and you, the relationship between you and you is number one relationship.

Ken Page:

I so agree.

Dr. Judith Orloff:

Yeah. And so the self-empathy creates the healing response to any kind of difficult situation.

 

How to Develop Your Empathy Genius to Experience Deeper Intimacy with Judith Orloff, M.D.

 

Prioritize cultivating self-empathy

 

Ken Page:

So that’s a place to start. Could you just give us maybe some more guidance around how you do that? For example, do you put your hand anywhere in your body? Do you say this out loud or is it just as effective to think it or to write it? We come out of a bad experience, what do we do? Really concretely, how do we turn this into a direct practice?

Dr. Judith Orloff:

Well, the practice of empathy is first, understanding, identifying your real feelings, like, “This felt horrible. I hated this. I feel miserable. I hate this person.” Just get to the bottom line of, “This person was so rude, how could they treat me…?” Get to that. See, what a lot of people do is they bypass that state because they don’t think it’s okay, it’s not spiritually correct, but you can never get to self-empathy or self-healing unless you deal with the real feelings first.

Ken Page:

So let it rip.

Dr. Judith Orloff:

Let it rip. You have to. You have to, because we all feel that way. We get hurt, our animal instincts come out. We just are angry. Anyways, we need to be honest with what we’re feeling and not with the person necessarily, but at least with your own journal, with your own self, your own heart, and say, “This was just the worst. I’m so sorry you had to go through this,” and you talk to yourself in this way.

And then you say, “I’m going to stop. I’m not going to do any work right now. I’m not going to do anything. I’m going to take care of myself. I’m going to listen to my intuition. I’ll take a bubble bath. I’ll light some candles. I’ll go for a hike, I’ll get a massage. I’ll just be nice to myself by putting my hand over my heart and activating the heart chakra,” which is in the middle of the chest, a technique that I talk about in this book as a way of coming back to yourself after difficult things happen.

And it’s an energetic way to come back to yourself by putting your hand on your heart chakra right here, focusing on something you love and saying, “We’ll work this out. This was horrible. We’ll work it out. We’ll get through this. Feelings are not facts. Feelings are temporary, and they come and they go, and this is the pits and we’ll get through this.”

So you have to talk to yourself in a very loving way as opposed to, “You really blew that. What did you do wrong to get this person so angry with you and so nasty? What did you do?” Because you come from parents like that who blamed you and criticized you and put you down, especially if you’re an empath and said, “Oh, you’re too sensitive, or you have to develop a thicker skin,” like my parents said. So I grew up with a lot of shame about being an empath.

 

Self-empathy creates the healing response to any kind of difficult situation. Share on X

 

Ken Page:

Yes.

Dr. Judith Orloff:

You might, at the first try is to come down on yourself. That’s what your instinct is, but that’s where you have to notice, “This is what I usually do and this is what I’m going to stop doing. So I have to recondition my own thinking to deal with difficult or disappointing or hurtful situations in a different way.” And my spiritual teacher, who’s a Daoist, says that, “When you beat yourself up a little bit less each day, it’s a sign of spiritual progress.”

Ken Page:

Oh, that’s beautiful. I love that. Yeah. So something just a little bit adjacent to that. You come out of a really difficult situation, a conflict, but you realize that you were not skillful or you hurt somebody else and you’re viscerally aware that you really did something that you don’t feel good about. Any thought for the words that we can use for ourselves when we’re experiencing that?

Dr. Judith Orloff:

Oh, yes. In empathy, you have to… In the book, I talk about making empathy statements, and this means to yourself and to somebody else. How do you word something so that it can get through to somebody else or get through to yourself? And the reality of life is that we make mistakes. We do things that we’re not proud of. We speak in ways we wish we could take back and this is the nature of learning.

But what you brought up Ken, which is so important, is that you realize it. You don’t try and blame somebody else for this, you’re accountable. Empathy means you’re compassionate and you’re accountable. We all make mistakes. Everyone who’s listening, don’t feel ashamed of making a mistake. We all make them.

And it’s part of our learning process of being human beings here on earth is that we make mistakes. And then the beauty of making a mistake is that you’ll have a chance to make amends.

Ken Page:

Yes.

 

How to Develop Your Empathy Genius to Experience Deeper Intimacy with Judith Orloff, M.D.

It’s important as a healing practice to condition yourself to practice self-empathy when things happen, as opposed to coming down on your precious self: the relationship between you and you is the number one relationship.

 

Dr. Judith Orloff:

And there’s a chapter in here on empathy and forgiveness and what that actually means and how to let go of resentments rather than hold onto them. A very powerful empathy tool is letting go of resentments, and it takes some conditioning to do that. And I go through how to do that because people just say, “Oh, I’m done. I’m done with…” These are all a healing practices. To let go of resentment is a huge healing triumph as far as I’m concerned.

Ken Page:

Beautiful. I so agree. And now I have to ask you to tell us what that practice is, but before you do, I just want to say something about what you just said, which I think is just so… It opened a door for me when you said it, which is that the degree to which I’m able to see my unskillful, unhelpful, uncompassionate behavior and talk to myself still with empathy and compassion, acknowledging that, but somehow, like you said, being able to get through to the inner child, to be able to talk about that, hold it with goodness, the degree to which I can do that then probably helps me be able to do that with my loved ones when I see what they’ve done that is not good or not right, or not helpful or not skillful and vice versa. When I can see that in them and learn to talk to them in that way, then probably I could learn to talk to me in that way too.

Dr. Judith Orloff:

Yes.

Ken Page:

So what a universal skill that is.

Dr. Judith Orloff:

Yes, absolutely. But you have to accept that these things will happen. You will make a mistake, you will disappoint loved ones, and you don’t want to, but you have a chance to be accountable, number one, to show empathy for yourself and say, “I made a terrible mistake and I’m gonna make amends to this person and just say, ‘I am so sorry I hurt you. I was triggered. I was not in my most empowered self and I said something I regret. I wish I could take it back. And I’m so sorry I hurt you, and I didn’t mean it. Not really. I didn’t mean it. It just came out.'”

I would do things like I have my own triggers, but big trigger is when I’m stressed out, if too many things are coming at me too fast, I tend to say something that I regret. And with my partner, I would say something like… We were just doing some remodel work on the house, which for empaths is just a terrible nightmare for me, to have that many people around.

Ken Page:

Yes.

Dr. Judith Orloff:

And always wanting something. They always want something. So I’m on edge. I’m not my normal self. And when I get that way, I say, “But I can’t be in a relationship.” That’s where I go, “Well, we don’t want to say that to your beloved.” And he goes, “You don’t?” I go, “Oh, I didn’t mean it.” So I was able to take it back, but now we’ve come to an agreement when I get overwhelmed like, “I think you need to take some time alone.”

Ken Page:

Yes.

Dr. Judith Orloff:

And that’s really helpful to me. And I go, “You’re right, I do.” And so no more talk when I’m in that state or when you’re in that state, everyone listening. You get into a high stress state and you might blurt out things that shouldn’t be blurted out, really. And so to prevent that, you need to have a plan. When I get in these states, how can I show empathy for my partner, for whoever and myself?

And the most empathic thing I can do is remove myself from the situation, zip it up and go into another room and meditate, take a bath, decrease stimulation, which is really important for empaths about techniques in the book and how to bring down sensory overload ’cause if you’re sensitive you need to bring it down.

The drama will go way up if you continue in that state. So you have to learn to stop yourself and say, “All right, I’m going to get in big trouble if I continue with this. So I’m going to take a break.” It’s a timeout, and you could prepare the other person if you’re intimate with them. You could say, “I get in these states and I’ve found that it’s best when I’m in these states to remove myself, and then we could rehook up later.”

Ken Page:

Yeah. Yeah.

Dr. Judith Orloff:

I think that’s an empathic act.

 

Empathy and deeper intimacy

 

Ken Page:

Yes, yes. And would you say that that’s particularly true for us empaths, that we can experience sensory overload easily, or when there’s a lot of pressure or we just sense a lot going on in the room that we get overwhelmed?

Dr. Judith Orloff:

Absolutely. But part of the empathic techniques that I’m writing about are how to identify that. So you just nip it in the bud, you feel it growing. I could feel it in my solar plexus, this overwhelm, the tightness. Or I start getting snippy or I start getting… And I just need to get away.

Ken Page:

So you’ve just described behavior and also a body experience that are indicators that it’s getting to be too much.

Dr. Judith Orloff:

Right. Everybody, you can go to that part in the book and you can focus on your body to train your body when you begin to go on overload.

Ken Page:

Beautiful.

Dr. Judith Orloff:

And sensory overload is very painful and you don’t want to get to that place. I get there in airports sometimes because it’s hard to control the energy in airports because it’s so crazy, especially if the flight is late. So it’s harder for me as an empathic person to be in airports. So I can do it, but not if I have to wait hours and hours, the setup for me to go into sensory overload, you see?

So I try and just be kind to myself if I can’t escape a situation and I show empathy or I go in the corner, that’s my big coping mechanism, is to go in the corner somewhere and put my purse next to me so that the sign that says, “Stay away,” to other people so I could close my eyes, take a deep breath, focus on my heart and center myself in those situations. And then when I get home, to really take care of myself. So if you’re in a situation, let’s say you’re in a conference, or even if you’re out on a date and it’s not going well.

Ken Page:

Yeah, you know what?

Dr. Judith Orloff:

Sure.

Ken Page:

If I could just stage this for you so that you could talk about it in this kind of way. The world of dating is such a painful world, and there’s so much unkindness and ghosting and unthoughtfulness and as well as the loneliness that informs so much of that and all the different feelings. So if you could maybe talk about that, all of the kind of overloads and pains and discomforts that happen in this crazy Wild West of dating and how we can build empathy for ourselves?

 

You can never get to self-empathy or self-healing unless you deal with the real feelings first. Share on X

 

Dr. Judith Orloff:

Well, what happens, everything that you just said is true, but what you need to do is not arrange a lot of dates at once, to not overload yourself. You need to do one at a time and see how it goes. And if you’re dating online and when you look at the profiles, you need to look for signs of empathy in the profile.

Ken Page:

Oh, beautiful. Say more about that. I have never heard it said that way. That’s really big. Yeah. Could you say more about that?

Dr. Judith Orloff:

Yeah. Sometimes if my clients are dating, a couple of them, I’ve gone over how to do an intuitive reading of somebody on the site and how to see signs of empathy and what they present. So it’s very important to do that because she would see a picture and show it to me and says, “What about this? He’s so cute.” And he would be having a drink in his hand and go, “Look, there’s a sign. Here’s a picture, he has a drink in his hand. That’s a red flag.” “Oh, I didn’t see the drink.”

So to be able to train people to see clearly for one thing, and look for people if they’re of service. Let’s say they love nature. And so they’re doing something to help the earth where they’re doing something to help someone other than themselves.

Ken Page:

Yes.

Dr. Judith Orloff:

Or caring for their parents, or they love flowers or see the pieces of music they’re attracted to and see what kind of music, if it’s meditation music, or if they’re meditators. You look for signs. You don’t want to go for those who are partying all the time, unless you want that. It just depends on what you’re looking for.

Ken Page:

Beautiful. Yeah.

Dr. Judith Orloff:

Yeah. Party all the time, there’s that too, but you have to really look at the profile and really feel, what’s in the background? Is this something I’m attracted to? Does their voice sound kind, this person in terms of how they’re writing? So you need to look at it with more discrimination.

Ken Page:

So true.

Dr. Judith Orloff:

Rather than just what they look like.

Ken Page:

So true. And you mentioned meditation, and I just want to mention that the foreword to this book is written by the Dalai Lama, so that says so much right there. So Judith, I want to go back to what you said about forgiveness. You were going to help us with some tools around forgiveness, and I don’t want to lose that.

 

How to Develop Your Empathy Genius to Experience Deeper Intimacy with Judith Orloff, M.D.

Empathy means you’re compassionate and you’re accountable: we all make mistakes and it’s part of our learning process of being human beings here on earth is that we make mistakes. And then the beauty of making a mistake is that you’ll have a chance to make amends.

 

Dr. Judith Orloff:

All right. Well, part of an expression of empathy is forgiveness. Whether you’re forgiving yourself or another person. All right. Personally, as an empath, and all you empaths must know this, that if you carry around a resentment, they just build over the years.

And especially as you age, if you’re carrying around tons of resentments, it affects your aging process. You don’t have that light, that youthful light anymore. You have this kind of misery, of bitterness that all these people did you wrong, and you have a right to hold onto it. And it’s all true. You do have a right to hold onto it, but go for it if you want to hold onto it.

But you pay a price, and the price is that it affects your health, it affects your view of the world. You keep repeating these boring stories over and over and over and over again to people about how you’ve been wronged and you start alienating people. So I don’t think it’s a good way to go.

And one of the themes of the genius of empathy is that we try to have empathy even for people we don’t like and we disagree with, and even if we can, for people who wronged us. And by this, I want to make very clear, I don’t mean having empathy for the act.

If they betrayed you, if they hurt you physically, if they stole your money, I’m not saying forgive them for that, but what empathy does, it takes your heart, stretches it one step further. So you could have empathy for the suffering or the woundedness or the cluelessness that was motivating this person.

Ken Page:

That was so beautifully said, that was so beautifully said.

Dr. Judith Orloff:

The magic healing formula that happens when you do that is that you detach from the person, so you’re not carrying them around in your mind anymore. It just happens when you do something like that and do that counter move of, “I’m going to have empathy for your suffering and I’m really going to try, and it doesn’t mean I’m forgiving what you did.”

That gives you distance, it clears up. Suddenly, you could see more of the sky and you could see more of the stars. You’re not just seeing that person who harmed you, so it helps detach you from the act so you could move on.

Ken Page:

Oh, so beautifully said. Yeah. And I love this concept of not necessarily that you even have to fully forgive, that a way to think about this task is just stretching your heart into empathy somewhat more and every bit more that you stretch it.

My dad, and this is something I’ve talked about, is a Holocaust survivor, and he said that the very hate that kept him alive during his concentration camp time, he realized that that hate would kill him if he didn’t get rid of it. And he said it took him half a century, but he said every time he felt it, he would pull it out of him and try to get rid of it piece by tiny piece.

And for those of us who have been deeply, deeply wounded, I love that imagery of being able to just do it piece by piece, little bit by little bit, to have that visceral experience of, as you described, like this enlarging, this expanding of your heart.

Dr. Judith Orloff:

Yes. And I want to say to everyone, you don’t have to do it. This is not something you force. Empathy is something you want to go after. It’s not something you ever force or if it doesn’t feel right, and it’s perfectly fine if you never want to do it if somebody really hurt you. You don’t have to do it.

But if there’s something in you that’s curious about what I’m saying, or if there’s a little instinct going, “Maybe she’s right, maybe I’ll give it a try.” So then you go towards it, but you don’t have to do this. You don’t have to forgive in this way. There are levels of forgiveness. There’s someone who stole your parking space. Yes, you want to forgive them. You don’t want to carry that around. That’s ridiculous. But if you had abusive parents, do you want to forgive them? That’s up to you.

Ken Page:

So true.

Dr. Judith Orloff:

Only you and your intuitive heart know that. And I have patients that I write about this in the book as it’s really interesting that many of my patients have been in this situation where they were abused by their parents. And when the parents were terminal, they were called to take care of the parent as they passed on. And they would come to me and go, “Judith, what should I do here? These people were horrible to me.”

Ken Page:

What do you say?

Dr. Judith Orloff:

Yeah, I say, “This is your intuitive call. If you decide to not do it, that’s perfectly fine. You don’t owe them anything. And if you decide to do it, that’s fine too. You go forward and you help them.” And so as your karma is clear with them, if they abused you and you’ve healed and you’ve had a healing life for yourself and you’ve emerged, you don’t have to do anything else. You really don’t.

And to do it out of guilt, it will be a miserable experience. But if you do it because, oddly, you feel like it despite everything they’ve done, then you go do it. And I’ll tell you, the patients who’ve decided to go do it, they were happy with their choice. And the patients who decided not to do it, they were happy with their choice.

 

Effects of opening your heart to greater empathy

 

Ken Page:

So powerful. I know we’re moving toward closing, but another question I want to ask you is just as a doctor, neurologically, physiologically, tell us some things about what happen to us when we open up to deeper empathy? How does that affect our brains and our bodies and our physical hearts and our well-being? What happens inside us?

Dr. Judith Orloff:

You stimulate your vagus nerve, and the vagus nerve is your friend. That’s the parasympathetic nervous system which quiets you down, which helps you feel bliss, which helps you feel contentedness, as opposed to the sympathetic which are the neurochemicals such as cortisol and adrenaline that make you frightened and upset all the time and stressed out and age you more quickly.

So when you’re showing empathy, you’re activating this vagus nerve, which is one of the biggest nerves in the body, and you want to feel that calmness as opposed to the drama and the frenzy.

So it activates your parasympathetic nervous system and the vagus nerve, which is something I have in the book, how other ways to activate it besides empathy, such as cold plunges and other things that will activate it, but that will calm you down.

And one of the healing tools of the book is how do you calm down in a chaotic world. Very important, calm down. So that’s the gift of the body when you empathize.

Ken Page:

What I love about your approach and why I really encourage everybody to get this book is because it captures this from the spiritual angle, the physiological angle, the relational angle, and also speaks in such deep and powerful ways about empathy as a tool for self-love, which is so, so important.

Judith, I have about a million more questions for you, but the one question that I’m going to close with is what do you want to leave this audience with? If there was one thing that you most wanted to say to this community of people that cares deeply about intimacy in their lives?

Dr. Judith Orloff:

To let your empathy and your empath nature shine and to not feel there’s anything to be ashamed of, or that you’ve done anything wrong because you haven’t, and I’m so sorry you were hurt. I’m so sorry that your parents or whoever didn’t see you as you deserve to be seen and loved and taught to develop this gift.

But however, not all people are given that. So you must start as an adult and you can give yourself that, and you can attract friends and lovers and people, peripheral people in your life who can support that in you. So it’s really a beautiful direction to walk, and that’s why I wrote this book, and I hope you can honor this in yourself.

Ken Page:

So beautifully said, and I think you’re going to touch the lives of so many people with this book, which is going to be available on April 9th, so you could pre-order it. And Judith, how can people learn more about you and your body of work and how can they find you and learn more about you?

Dr. Judith Orloff:

My website is D-R-judithorloff.com, drjudithorloff.com. My launch book event is in Venice, California at Mystic Journeys in Santa Monica on April 13th. You’re all invited. I don’t know where you are, but you’re all invited to come to it.

And I have other book events on my website, under my lecture schedule, and I’d love to see you there. I’d love to have this conversation with you and expand the conversation on empathy. And I also have an empath support newsletter, a monthly newsletter that’s free that you could sign up for.

Ken Page:

It’s wonderful. I get it.

Dr. Judith Orloff:

Oh, thank you. Thank you. And thank you for having me on, Ken. You have a beautiful show.

Ken Page:

Oh, thank you. It was so wonderful to have you here. I encourage everybody to buy this book, and I encourage you to leave comments about your experiences with these ideas, with this episode and with the book itself. So thank you so much for being here.

Dr. Judith Orloff:

You’re very welcome.

 

Dr. Judith Orloff’s new book The Genius of Empathy offers support, empowerment and understanding for empaths and highly sensitive people.

When you purchase the book, you’ll also receive a free e-book, plus the Empathy Gift Collection.

>> Get the Genius of Empathy book here. <<

 

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